Body Shell Fit

We did the first body assembly with the wheels and tyres last week, and the fit looks very good to the tyres. The fronts are nicely centralised in the arches, and the rear Michelin 335 / 35's are looking slightly low to where my CAD models predicted.....a tad too close the wheel arches! But the rear arch is approx 10mm to low, so that will improve the clearance. And the rim and tyre will stroke inwards approx 12mm with 45mm of bump, and Anthony has made-up a set of dummy dampers with both nominal and 45mm bump and drop positions. So when we get it back on the ramp to fit the brakes next week, we will check the clearances with the bump clearances to the arches. We have also now set-up datum locations for the front body. The next step is to get the sill panels fitted with datum locations then we will be getting the rear body set-up and the frame and hinges fitted. We also weighed the rolling chassis and checked the driveshaft and upper rear wishbone angles to CAD, will post those figures tomorrow.

When I started to surface the bodyshell scan, and in parallel cross checking to the actual shell, I found that the sills are in fact different lengths side to side, the LHS being approx 20 longer. One of the quirks of having a set of body panels taken from moulds of an original 917, in fact Pipers car.

But to keep things symmetrical for the chassis I designed the frames that mount the rear face of the sills at the same X (or longitudinal position) side to side. Always knowing that I might have to tweak things when we got to mounting the body.

So I have had to revise the LHS support frame rear-wards by 15mm, and the RHS forward 7mm. Luckily I was able to go back to the chassis wireframe and revise the 3D points, and the chassis and chassis jig models updated! So when John starts his chassis manufacture, we can get the revised tubes laser cut to the new lengths.

The next stage was to pack the doors to get flush to the body, and then see how the door bucks (that John my partner had manufactured a some time ago), fitted. As you can see the fit is ok, but we will need to tweak to get a good fit for each side. And another quirk of this shell, is the cockpit is offset approx 10mm to one side!

Door Fit

Door buck profiles, being fine tuned to the final bodyshell position. Anthony will then re-assemble and inprove the stucture by adding a third profile at the front of the door and mounting on a baseboard, and finally secure the doors into the bucks. Then off to Wragg Brothers in Wickford to get the aluminium door frames manufactured.

Bodyshell Fit

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917 Sub Sections

Contact Us

Tel: Dave Eaton 07745 480 640

Tel: John Hartland 07711 807 928

Email: info@icon-engineering.co.uk

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From the Galleries

  • 150923-body on chassis 1
  • Rolling chassis 3
  • White 9

  • 150611-transparent body and chassis 3
  • Rolling chassis 2
  • Rolling chassis with me for website